Style 2

Zemaye’s Take: Bandwagon imitative fashion babble talk.

Examples:

PAIR as a clunky verb – Play with texture by PAIRING a velvet skirt with a silk top.

STUN as a verb but oddly without an object – Ada STUNNED in a red dress

Clothes (often poorly-tailored) referred to as PIECES to justify inflated prices – she wore a piece from the Spring/Summer collection

Pretentious jargon that nobody understands – Ada’s new Spring/Summer resort collection.

Biko what is ‘resort’?

And what if we created our own language and let oyibo copy us? What of Harmattan collection? Rainy/Dry collection? Early/Late collection?

Solution: The best language is simple, sincere, and should actually make sense. Be original. Be real.

(via http://americanahblog.com/)

1980 Pie

Chef Showtime aka Tokyo Niyeli aka David Broom from Real World: New Orleans fame (“Come On Be My Baby Tonight…”)

Awkwafina “NYC Bitche$” (Official Video

Someone give this girl a record deal…

meka2dbz:

during my set at hennypalooza DC, pusha t came and we did an impromptu performance of a couple tracks.

life is good.

New album Calm Down out now on Innit Recordings / KLS: smarturl.it/LOLAWOLF

thinksquad:

If you take to Twitter to express your views on a hot-button issue, does the government have an interest in deciding whether you are spreading “misinformation’’? If you tweet your support for a candidate in the November elections, should taxpayer money be used to monitor your speech and evaluate your “partisanship’’?
My guess is that most Americans would answer those questions with a resounding no. But the federal government seems to disagree. The National Science Foundation , a federal agency whose mission is to “promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity and welfare; and to secure the national defense,” is funding a project to collect and analyze your Twitter data.
The project is being developed by researchers at Indiana University, and its purported aim is to detect what they deem “social pollution” and to study what they call “social epidemics,” including how memes — ideas that spread throughout pop culture — propagate. What types of social pollution are they targeting? “Political smears,” so-called “astroturfing” and other forms of “misinformation.”
Named “Truthy,” after a term coined by TV host Stephen Colbert, the project claims to use a “sophisticated combination of text and data mining, social network analysis, and complex network models” to distinguish between memes that arise in an “organic manner” and those that are manipulated into being.
But there’s much more to the story. Focusing in particular on political speech, Truthy keeps track of which Twitter accounts are using hashtags such as #teaparty and #dems. It estimates users’ “partisanship.” It invites feedback on whether specific Twitter users, such as the Drudge Report, are “truthy” or “spamming.” And it evaluates whether accounts are expressing “positive” or “negative” sentiments toward other users or memes.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/truthy-project-is-unworthy-of-tax-dollars/2014/10/17/a3274faa-531b-11e4-809b-8cc0a295c773_story.html

What is this? The new COINTELPRO? thinksquad:

If you take to Twitter to express your views on a hot-button issue, does the government have an interest in deciding whether you are spreading “misinformation’’? If you tweet your support for a candidate in the November elections, should taxpayer money be used to monitor your speech and evaluate your “partisanship’’?
My guess is that most Americans would answer those questions with a resounding no. But the federal government seems to disagree. The National Science Foundation , a federal agency whose mission is to “promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity and welfare; and to secure the national defense,” is funding a project to collect and analyze your Twitter data.
The project is being developed by researchers at Indiana University, and its purported aim is to detect what they deem “social pollution” and to study what they call “social epidemics,” including how memes — ideas that spread throughout pop culture — propagate. What types of social pollution are they targeting? “Political smears,” so-called “astroturfing” and other forms of “misinformation.”
Named “Truthy,” after a term coined by TV host Stephen Colbert, the project claims to use a “sophisticated combination of text and data mining, social network analysis, and complex network models” to distinguish between memes that arise in an “organic manner” and those that are manipulated into being.
But there’s much more to the story. Focusing in particular on political speech, Truthy keeps track of which Twitter accounts are using hashtags such as #teaparty and #dems. It estimates users’ “partisanship.” It invites feedback on whether specific Twitter users, such as the Drudge Report, are “truthy” or “spamming.” And it evaluates whether accounts are expressing “positive” or “negative” sentiments toward other users or memes.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/truthy-project-is-unworthy-of-tax-dollars/2014/10/17/a3274faa-531b-11e4-809b-8cc0a295c773_story.html

What is this? The new COINTELPRO?

thinksquad:

If you take to Twitter to express your views on a hot-button issue, does the government have an interest in deciding whether you are spreading “misinformation’’? If you tweet your support for a candidate in the November elections, should taxpayer money be used to monitor your speech and evaluate your “partisanship’’?

My guess is that most Americans would answer those questions with a resounding no. But the federal government seems to disagree. The National Science Foundation , a federal agency whose mission is to “promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity and welfare; and to secure the national defense,” is funding a project to collect and analyze your Twitter data.

The project is being developed by researchers at Indiana University, and its purported aim is to detect what they deem “social pollution” and to study what they call “social epidemics,” including how memes — ideas that spread throughout pop culture — propagate. What types of social pollution are they targeting? “Political smears,” so-called “astroturfing” and other forms of “misinformation.”

Named “Truthy,” after a term coined by TV host Stephen Colbert, the project claims to use a “sophisticated combination of text and data mining, social network analysis, and complex network models” to distinguish between memes that arise in an “organic manner” and those that are manipulated into being.

But there’s much more to the story. Focusing in particular on political speech, Truthy keeps track of which Twitter accounts are using hashtags such as #teaparty and #dems. It estimates users’ “partisanship.” It invites feedback on whether specific Twitter users, such as the Drudge Report, are “truthy” or “spamming.” And it evaluates whether accounts are expressing “positive” or “negative” sentiments toward other users or memes.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/truthy-project-is-unworthy-of-tax-dollars/2014/10/17/a3274faa-531b-11e4-809b-8cc0a295c773_story.html

What is this? The new COINTELPRO?

(via nprcodeswitch)

nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.
Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’
Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian
nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.
Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’
Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian

nprfreshair:

Human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson represents those who have been abandoned. His clients are people on death row — abused and neglected children who were prosecuted as adults and placed in adult prisons where they were beaten and sexually abused, and mentally disabled people whose illnesses helped land them in prison where their special needs were unmet.

Today he spoke to us about justice in the 21st century:

"The new statistic from the Justice [Department] is really disheartening: The Justice Department is now reporting that one in three black male babies born in the 21st century is expected to go to jail or prison. The statistic for Latino boys is one in six. That statistic was not true in the 20th century. It was not true in the 19th century. It didn’t become true until the 21st century. That means we have enormous work to do to improve our commitment to society that is not haunted and undermined and corrupted by our legacy of racial inequality.”

One Lawyer’s Fight For Young Blacks And ‘Just Mercy’

Photo: Linda Nylind, The Guardian

(via npr)

dear-white-people:

Going to see Dear White People tonight? Join the conversation about the film afterwards with #DWPLobbyTalk!

Get tickets: http://bit.ly/DWPtix

The film was amazing!